UA-60120270-1
Site logo

Neon Audio

Why is Neon Audio the best choice to mix my project?

Please see the Mixing page and About pages to understand why I have the right mixture of credentials, listening experience, communication skills, and technical ability to make your music the best it can be, all at a great value.

I recorded all my songs myself. I could mix them, too. Why should I pay someone to do it for me?

If you (or someone in your band/group) are juggling the tasks of songwriting, producing, recording, mixing, and mastering, chances are something is going to get dropped. Very few people are talented enough to be proficient in all of these skills, never mind the loss of perspective that often occurs when one person attempts to handle every step of music production.

Not everyone can afford to rent a recording studio, but everyone
can afford to hire a professional to mix their recordings. It will make all the difference.

What is the general process for an online mixing project?

First contact me for availability and to discus the details of your project, like what sound you're after and some reference songs that best represent what you want. The more detail the better, i.e., "I really like the vocal sound on this Sloppy Joe and the Sesame Buns song," or "the bass in this old song of mine sounds great, but I'm not happy with anything else," or "This song really captures the overall sound I want." Once we’re on the same page, you will send me your recorded music (see below for how to do this). For new clients, I’ll put together a rough mix of one song, free of charge.

Then it's time to gather your feedback. I can either send you audio files or set up a stream for live input and adjustment (isn't the Internet great?). For the first mix, you should let me know if I'm on the right track or need take a left turn. Once I've collect your feedback, I make adjustments and let you listen to another mix. This process will continue until you are satisfied with the mix for each song, but most often it takes 2-3 mixes. Revisions are unlimited, as long as they are along the same direction we decided to take after the first mix.

A similar process would take place if you were to attend a mixing session in person. But when it is happening online, the key is communication. Expect me to be checking in often for your feedback, and never hesitate to get in touch with me.

How does payment work?

After you have received your free rough mix, I ask for 50% of the total project fee before continuing work. I will send you a PayPal invoice to request this payment.

Be aware that I insert sections of silence every 30 seconds into all mixes before receiving full payment. This is a blanket policy for all clients that I have adopted in order to protect myself. Of course, if you pay the total fee up front, I will not insert any silences.

How do I send my recorded music to you?

You can use the upload page right on this website, or a large file transfer service like Dropbox or WeTransfer. For the transfer services, you can use greg@neonaudio.pro as the recipient address. Free Dropbox accounts are limited to 2GB, but with WeTransfer you can send multiple 2GB files.

To make sure everything comes across quickly and correctly, I ask for some preparation of files before transfer. Please see the questions below for details.

I use Pro Tools. How do I prepare my audio files for online transfer?

First, please label your tracks descriptively. You can use abbreviations (i.e., backup vocals could be BVox1, BVox2, etc.), just make sure the labels are clear. If you have any software instruments or MIDI tracks, you will have to bounce them down to audio tracks (click here for a video tutorial on that). If you want to add notes for me, you can use the comments section found under View>Edit Window Views>Comments.

Next, it’s best to clear out unused audio to slim down the size of your session. This will save time for you in uploading... and for me in downloading! NOTE: The following directions will create a smaller, separate copy of your session, retaining your original session and everything you’ve recorded. In other words, you won’t be deleting anything permanently. Here's a video of the process, or look below that for text directions:

  • When the session is ready to be sent, first save the current version by going to File>Save.
  • Then, in your edit window, click on the arrow in the bottom right corner (or go to VIew>Other Displays>Region List) to show the Region List of all your audio files.
  • From the top right corner of the Region List, click the arrow and navigate to Select>Unused.
  • Click the Region List arrow again and choose ‘Clear.’ In the dialog box that pops up, choose ‘Remove.’
  • Now we want to make all the remaining regions start at the same point. This will ensure that all the tracks stay in time relative to each other. Begin by clicking and dragging through all your tracks to select them all.
  • Go to Edit>Select All to select all the regions of each track.
  • Then go to Edit>Consolidate Region. It may take a few minutes to process if you have a lot of tracks, but once finished, every track should consist of one region that starts at the beginning of the session.
  • Now we want to save this slimmed down session as a separate folder. Go to File>Save Copy In.
  • In the dialog window that pops up, under ‘Items to Copy,’ be sure to check ‘All Audio Files.’ Leave the ‘Session Parameters’ such as sample rate and bit depth where they are, as these default to the settings you recorded with and you don’t want to resample any audio. Hit ‘OK.’
  • Name the session by the name of the song it contains. Then navigate to where you want to save the project. If you are sending me multiple sessions, you may want to gather everything in a new folder on your desktop for easy access. Save the session.
  • Navigate to where you saved the session and compress the folder to a .ZIP file. For Macs, you can simply control click (right click) on the folder and choose 'Compress'. Windows users can download a free program such as 7-Zip. Once the .ZIP file is made, the session is ready to be sent to me!
  • Now if you return to Pro Tools, the session that is still open is the original one. You can close it without saving to retain your full Region List and unconsolidated regions (remember, we saved the session right before starting this whole process, so it will revert to that version). Or you can choose to save this cleaned up session. Either way, none of your actual audio files will be deleted.

I use Logic. How do I prepare my audio files for online transfer?

First, please label your tracks descriptively. You can use abbreviations (i.e., backup vocals could be BVox1, BVox2, etc.), just make sure the labels are clear. If you have any software instruments or MIDI tracks, you should bounce them down to audio tracks (click to highlight your software instrument track and use the shortcut Control+Command+B. Click ‘OK’ in the dialog box that appears as the default options are optimal). If you have any notes for me, you can leave them in the ‘Notes’ section, accessible in the top right corner.

Next, it’s best to clear out unused audio to slim down the size of your project. This will save time for you in uploading... and for me in downloading! NOTE: The following directions will create a smaller, separate copy of your project, retaining your original project and everything you’ve recorded. In other words, you won’t be deleting anything permanently. Here's a video, or look below that for text directions:

  • Click on the Media button in the top right corner and select the ‘Bin’ tab.
  • From the ‘Edit’ menu in the Bin (not the main Logic one), choose ‘Select Unused’.
  • Go back to the same ‘Edit’ menu in the Bin and choose ‘Delete.’ Don’t worry... you are only deleting from the Audio Bin. The original audio files will remain on your hard drive in the project folder.
  • Now that we’re left with only the audio files that are in use, we can save a copy of this project that will be smaller than the original. Go to ‘File’ and choose ‘Save A Copy As.’
  • In the dialog box that pops up, make sure the ‘Include Assets’ checkbox is selected. By default, any asset (i.e., audio files, ESX instruments, Ultrabeat samples) that you are using in the project will also be checked. Leave them all checked to ensure everything comes across.
  • Name the project by the name of the song it contains. Then navigate to where you want to save the project. If you are sending me multiple sessions, you may want to gather everything in a new folder on your desktop for easy access. Save the project.
  • Navigate to where you saved the session and compress the folder to a .ZIP file. You can simply control click (right click) on the folder and choose 'Compress'. Once the .ZIP file is made, the project is ready to be sent to me!
  • If you return to Logic, you can go to the main Logic ‘Edit’ menu and choose ‘Undo Delete in Audio Bin’ to return all your audio files to the Bin.

I use Garageband. How do I prepare my audio files for online transfer?

For Garageband projects you can simply send the Garageband file for each song. Logic is able to open Garageband files, so I will open your project with Logic and mix from there.

I use Audacity. How do I prepare my audio files for online transfer?

Simply send me the Audacity file (ending in .aup) along with its corresponding resource folder (it should have the same name as the .aup file). I will need both of these in order to open your project.

It's a good idea to compress the resource folder into a .ZIP file.
For Macs, you can simply control click (right click) on the folder and choose 'Compress'. Windows users can download a free program such as 7-Zip.

I'm using another type of software. How do I prepare my audio files for online transfer?

If you have recorded your music in another digital audio workstation (DAW), or perhaps used a portable recording system, you can still send me your music by exporting all your parts/tracks as individual audio files. I will then reassemble them in Logic for mixing. It’s important that all the tracks start at the same point in time so they will line up correctly for me, even if that means there is 3 minutes and 31 seconds of silence on the sax track before the solo comes in.

It’s probably best to seek out specific exporting instructions for your workstation, but here is a general guideline:
  • Open your project and go to the edit window or track view.
  • Go through each track and bypass or turn off any EQ, processing, or effects. If you want to keep these effects for the track, you may leave them on, but please make a separate, unaltered file with no processing and label the two files appropriately.
  • Set the gain for all tracks at zero, or unity. Make sure your master fader is also at unity.
  • Highlight all the tracks from starting point 0:00 (or at least from the starting point of the earliest track in the timeline).
  • Solo the track you want to bounce down.
  • Use your DAW’s menu to export the audio. This step will vary depending on the platform, but usually in the ‘File’ menu there is an option to ‘Export Audio’ or ‘Bounce to Disk’ or maybe just ‘Bounce.’
  • Choose the format of the file (either WAV or AIFF). Save it as ‘mono’ if it is a mono track, or as ‘stereo interleaved’ if it’s a stereo track. Choose a bit depth and sample rate that is the same as you recorded at. If you are unsure what that is, you can use 16 bit with a 44100 sample rate.
  • Name the file descriptively so I know what it contains (i.e., rhythm guitar, lead vocals, sax solo, etc). Save it in a folder labeled with the name of the song. You will use this folder to collect all the other tracks for the song.
  • Unsolo the track you just saved and repeat steps 5 through 8 for each track of the song. Be careful to export all the needed tracks. When you are finished, you should be left with a folder that contains a single audio file for each track.
  • Navigate to where you saved your folder and compress it to a .ZIP file. For Macs, you can simply control click (right click) on the folder and choose 'Compress'. Windows users can download a free program such as 7-Zip. Once the .ZIP file is made, the session is ready to be sent to me!

If you have any trouble, you can contact me for help and I will assist as best I can.

What are your turnaround times?

It really depends on what the client wants and the particulars of their project. A lot of online mixing sites promise “fast turnaround time” and, yes, if you need an album mixed in 2-3 days, I can oblige. But I prefer to let the project dictate the pace and, most importantly, allow for review. Sometimes several revisions are necessary to get everything just right, with back and forth listening and consultation between me and the client. For this reason, I prefer not to make broad, sweeping promises when the specific variables of each individual project are so vastly different.
That said, if you are working under a timeline, be sure to let me know and I will accommodate while still trying to leave some time for review and revision.

Do you have any samples of your work?

Yep, right here.

I have another question not covered here!

Send me an email and I’ll be happy to answer any other questions. If it’s a good question, I’ll even add it to this list!